Written Submissions

Input from individuals and organisations was critical to the Royal Commission's task of investigating issues relating to its terms of reference.  Written submissions were one of the main ways people contributed to the Commission’s work.  To help people prepare submissions, the Royal Commission released an issues paper.  The closing date for written submissions was Friday, 29 May 2015.  Nearly 1000 submissions were received.

Those sending in submissions had the choice of opting for them to be treated by the Royal Commission as public, anonymous or confidential. This categorisation has implications both for how the Royal Commission could reference the submission in its report, and for whether or not the Royal Commission decided to publish the submission on this website.
 
If a person or organisation requested confidentiality, the submission (or the identified confidential parts of it) were not referenced in an identifying manner or published. If a person or organisation requested anonymity, their identifying details were removed in the event that their submission was referenced or published. If a person or organisation requested that the submission be treated as public, then the Royal Commission could choose to reference it and publish it on the website in full.
 
However, even where the Royal Commission decided to publish a submission, we removed or redacted (black out) parts of submissions for legal, privacy and/or safety reasons, including if they may identify or contain information about people affected by family violence (other than the person making the submission). The Royal Commission also reserved the right not to publish any submission at all if it considered it inappropriate to do so.

By publishing them on its website, the Royal Commission expressed no opinion as to the content or accuracy of any of the submissions or other materials to which the submissions may refer. 
 

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